Prolific: SingPoWriMo Day 18-20 Update

Screen Shot 2018-04-20 at 8.07.41 PM

I wish I could report that I have been prolific on account of poetry month, but unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on one’s perspective), I have spent far more time reacquainting myself with the riot of poetry and the maestros who beautify our landscape with their words.

Please enjoy my gleeful discoveries from the past few days:

  • Desmond Kon Zhicheng-Mingdé’s Thirty Seven Reasons Red is RadAllegory 2 is from this work.
  • Gwee Li Sui’s Haikuku, 120 Singaporean haikus.
  • Tse Hao Guang’s Deeds of Light.

 

Feature Photo: Unabashedly verdant & prolific! Taken at Dairy Farm Nature Park, Singapore.

 

Advertisements

Awakenings: SingPoWriMo Day 14-17 Update

Screen Shot 2018-04-20 at 8.11.29 PM

Notes:

  • I wrote this as part of the 30-Day Singapore Poetry Writing Month Challenge.  I have never tried writing a Ghazal although one of my all time favourite poets, Omar Khayyam, wrote many in this style. It is originally an Arabic verse form used to convey loss & romantic longing.
  • I was thinking of Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s sonnet “How do I love Thee”, and borrowed a few of her lines.
  • This is my contribution to Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Awakenings
  • Feature Photo: Black Swans awakening from slumber at the Eco-Lake, Singapore Botanic gardens.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

My exploration of new poetry continues.  Some of it is rather confuzzling (I love suggestion that I am in a state of confusion & puzzlement!  Thank you y.prior for the introduction to this delicious word!).  Some eye-opening & mindblowing (reading lots of poetry written by Singaporeans; yes!  we do have a body of work to boast of).  And some I simply love! love! love! (Jack Spicer, Amy Lowell,  Tse Hao Guang).

I have experimented with some new forms: some I find easier to use than others.  I am also consciously working on elevating the writing; I continue to struggle with what this means, and how to get it done effectively.

Moment: Lesson 5 Capture Motion

This lesson in Daily Post’s Developing Your Eye challenges us to think on the fleeting Moments we encounter each day.  There are moments every day, big or small, that briefly touch our soul: exchanging a smile with a fellow-runner as we run towards each other, a cuddle with a child, a chewy oatmeal cookie oozing with chocolate chips. Can you recall a Moment you’ve experienced today? Continue reading “Moment: Lesson 5 Capture Motion”

A-ha! SingPoWriMo Day 1-5 Update

It has been an educational 5 days:

  • 5 days, 5 poems released into the Wild
  • I’ve tried a Somonka & a Ghazal, both of which I’ve only become acquainted with this week.
  • every day is a challenge not to faint from intimidation, being amongst much younger, hugely intellectual and as far as I can surmise, extremely talented poets
  • going back to the basics & asking the question: Why do we write Poetry?  (Thoughts, anyone?)

Continue reading “A-ha! SingPoWriMo Day 1-5 Update”

Changing Seasons March 2018: the Son is Risen!

March has been a time of preparation, of waiting, a time of Lent.  It has been a time of self-examination (not a pleasant endeavour) & a time of mindful charity (to give in ways which are often uncomfortable).  It was a time of growing pains (sigh!  even at 50!), of the realisation that one can have a great deal more patience & compassion (sobering). Continue reading “Changing Seasons March 2018: the Son is Risen!”

Natural World: Lesson 4 Leading Lines

A good photographer is a constant observer. Out in nature, we have opportunities to watch and study a scene, from big, sweeping changes — like the sky at dusk — to the tiniest details, like the subtle bends in bare branches.

While shooting outdoors, look for natural lines that lead your eyes to different parts of the frame. Study the bend of a stream, or the curve of a petal. How can you use these lines in your composition?  – Developing Your Eye II, Lesson 4: Leading Lines – Continue reading “Natural World: Lesson 4 Leading Lines”

Searching Our Archives #3: I will keep on running

Running is a metaphor for how I want to tackle life: the odds may be against me, but I will try anyway.

I was chatting some years ago with a Runner Friend, back before I ran regularly. She was extolling the joys of running and my excuse: I am so short & stout (contrasting with her tall & lanky build), how on earth am I supposed to be running?  She said soothingly to me that her running friends were of different sizes and physiques. I was somewhat mollified by our conversation, although somewhat incredulous.

I still wouldn’t consider myself a serious runner:  I don’t run far, I don’t run long, I don’t compete.  But I am serious about my running.  I made a start when I was approaching 30 because I was struggling with the mortality of my life (my mid-life crisis came early).  I figured if I was ever struck down by a debilitating illness, being healthy would be an advantage.  I also thought the discipline of pushing myself one more step would be helpful if I ever needed to fight for my life.

Just about 20 years later, this was all called to test. The Hospitalisation and The Subsequent Rehabilitation called up all the fitness reserve and determination I had built up. Having to re-learn how to walk in the hospital on account of deteriorated muscles, and then rebuilding the stamina which pneumonia had depleted.  The promise of running again became my life line.

It has been almost 9 months since I left the hospital.  My runs are no longer frenetic goal-driven outings.  I am enjoying my rambles and zen moments again.  For peace of mind and a sense of freedom, there is no where I’d rather be than out on a run, wherever that takes me.

I am not so naive to think I that I can do this indefinitely; both my athletic parents have had to exchange their sporting passions for less vigorous cardiopulmonary, muscle-maintaining pursuits.  But for as long as I can, I will hit that pavement.

Notes:

  • The Feature Photo was taken in Bangkok on the Cycle/Pedestrian Overpass linking Lumpini & Benjakitti Parks in January 2018.
  • This post is written in response to my searching through my archives – something which I have decided to do once a month this year.

Sunrise, Sunset

I am a “later-in-life” runner.  There, I have taken a risk and said that out loud; in cyberspace no less.

View original post 396 more words