Natural World: Lesson 4 Leading Lines

A good photographer is a constant observer. Out in nature, we have opportunities to watch and study a scene, from big, sweeping changes — like the sky at dusk — to the tiniest details, like the subtle bends in bare branches.

While shooting outdoors, look for natural lines that lead your eyes to different parts of the frame. Study the bend of a stream, or the curve of a petal. How can you use these lines in your composition?  – Developing Your Eye II, Lesson 4: Leading Lines – Continue reading “Natural World: Lesson 4 Leading Lines”

Searching Our Archives #3: I will keep on running

Running is a metaphor for how I want to tackle life: the odds may be against me, but I will try anyway.

I was chatting some years ago with a Runner Friend, back before I ran regularly. She was extolling the joys of running and my excuse: I am so short & stout (contrasting with her tall & lanky build), how on earth am I supposed to be running?  She said soothingly to me that her running friends were of different sizes and physiques. I was somewhat mollified by our conversation, although somewhat incredulous.

I still wouldn’t consider myself a serious runner:  I don’t run far, I don’t run long, I don’t compete.  But I am serious about my running.  I made a start when I was approaching 30 because I was struggling with the mortality of my life (my mid-life crisis came early).  I figured if I was ever struck down by a debilitating illness, being healthy would be an advantage.  I also thought the discipline of pushing myself one more step would be helpful if I ever needed to fight for my life.

Just about 20 years later, this was all called to test. The Hospitalisation and The Subsequent Rehabilitation called up all the fitness reserve and determination I had built up. Having to re-learn how to walk in the hospital on account of deteriorated muscles, and then rebuilding the stamina which pneumonia had depleted.  The promise of running again became my life line.

It has been almost 9 months since I left the hospital.  My runs are no longer frenetic goal-driven outings.  I am enjoying my rambles and zen moments again.  For peace of mind and a sense of freedom, there is no where I’d rather be than out on a run, wherever that takes me.

I am not so naive to think I that I can do this indefinitely; both my athletic parents have had to exchange their sporting passions for less vigorous cardiopulmonary, muscle-maintaining pursuits.  But for as long as I can, I will hit that pavement.

Notes:

  • The Feature Photo was taken in Bangkok on the Cycle/Pedestrian Overpass linking Lumpini & Benjakitti Parks in January 2018.
  • This post is written in response to my searching through my archives – something which I have decided to do once a month this year.

All things bright and beautiful

I am a “later-in-life” runner.  There, I have taken a risk and said that out loud; in cyberspace no less.

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Warmth: Lesson 1 Quality of Light

This Butterfly Pea Flower, basking in the warmth of morning sun, was a pleasant discovery as I walked through the charming neighbourhood of Tiong Bahru.

Lesson 1 of Developing Your Eye Part 2, invites us to think about light.  The word photography means “drawing with light” in Greek.  I must admit that I have not paused to think of what I do with the camera as drawing.  As I mull on this, however, I am tickled by how apropos it is.  For this assignment, we are challenged to consider the direction & quality of light as we look through our cameras. Continue reading “Warmth: Lesson 1 Quality of Light”

Architecture: Lesson 10 Go Monochrome

I spent a happy hour exploring the charming neighbourhood of Tiong Bahru  last week.  It is one of Singapore’s oldest housing estates turned trendy by all the cafes and shops that have taken up residence.  While we visit to shop and eat here frequently, I haven’t taken the time to wander around.  It is amazing how different things look when one is not pressured by time or agenda; when we have time to stop and peer at fruits growing, to discover hidden gems. Continue reading “Architecture: Lesson 10 Go Monochrome”

Silence in Bangkok: Peaceful Morning Runs

Morning runs are one of my highlights when in Bangkok.  In a city where traffic starts to build up by 7:30am, we discovered this oasis some years back: Benjakiti Park (pictured above), where in a small space, one could run in relative silence, detached from the smog and traffic noises just beyond.  There are several such park oases in Bangkok: Lumpini, Benchasiri and Benjakiti. Continue reading “Silence in Bangkok: Peaceful Morning Runs”

Weathered, not Worn

Outdoor Chair

The effects of the weather and time can be harsh and unkind, very often resulting in wear & tear damage.  Teak outdoor furniture is one of those exceptions, where exposure to the elements lovingly renders each piece majestically beautiful.  Teak naturally contains silica, which makes it resistant to fungal infestations and the effects of water; hence, they can be appreciated with minimal upkeep.

They are an analogy for how I want to live on this other side of 50: I may be weathered, but I certainly am not worn.

Feature Photo: A much loved Teak Lounging Chair in our Balcony Garden.