Season of Travail: A and I Poetry Challenge

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Mulling over metre & rhyme (iambic pentametre, feminine endings, sprung rhythms), good & bad rhymes (is there such a thing?) & the humorous nuggets of wisdom found in Stephen Fry’s The Ode Less Travelled has kept me suitably occupied these past weeks. The exercises found here have brought me back to the basics of poetry creation which have been at the same time enlightening and exhausting. Continue reading “Season of Travail: A and I Poetry Challenge”

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Refashioning Rules

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As I ran down Orchard Road this morning, I mulled over Debbie’s OneWordSunday prompt, Rules.  I have, at the behest of Older Daughter who is my consultant in all things poetic, started reading & working through Stephen Fry’s The Ode Less Travelled: Unlocking the Poet Within. Reacquainting myself with metre & rhyme will hopefully give me more control; if I want to play outside the box, it would be good to first get to know the box. Continue reading “Refashioning Rules”

Heart of the Matter

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Poem note: a somonka is essentially 2 tankas on written on the theme of Love.

Submitted in response to Amanda & Ineke’s A&I Poetry Challenge, Aug 2018 to write a Heart poem.

This is one of my favourite pieces of music, and I thought of it as I reread the poem. It is usually soloed by a violin; the cello gives it an interesting texture. Enjoy!

Feature Photo taken on 30 June 2018 at Benchaswari Park, Bangkok.

 

Voice of the Sublime

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In this month’s entry for the A and I Poetry Challenge to write a short 5-line poem, I thought I would try the version of a cinquain as used by Adelaide Crapsey, an early twentieth-century poet. Her form had 22 syllables distributed among the five lines in a 2, 4, 6, 8, and 2 pattern. Her poems share a similarity with the Japanese tanka, another five-line form & another favourite of mine, in their focus on imagery and the natural world. Continue reading “Voice of the Sublime”

Prolific: SingPoWriMo Day 18-20 Update

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I wish I could report that I have been prolific on account of poetry month, but unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on one’s perspective), I have spent far more time reacquainting myself with the riot of poetry and the maestros who beautify our landscape with their words.

Please enjoy my gleeful discoveries from the past few days:

  • Desmond Kon Zhicheng-Mingdé’s Thirty Seven Reasons Red is RadAllegory 2 is from this work.
  • Gwee Li Sui’s Haikuku, 120 Singaporean haikus.
  • Tse Hao Guang’s Deeds of Light.

 

Feature Photo: Unabashedly verdant & prolific! Taken at Dairy Farm Nature Park, Singapore.

 

Awakenings: SingPoWriMo Day 14-17 Update

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Notes:

  • I wrote this as part of the 30-Day Singapore Poetry Writing Month Challenge.  I have never tried writing a Ghazal although one of my all time favourite poets, Omar Khayyam, wrote many in this style. It is originally an Arabic verse form used to convey loss & romantic longing.
  • I was thinking of Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s sonnet “How do I love Thee”, and borrowed a few of her lines.
  • This is my contribution to Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Awakenings
  • Feature Photo: Black Swans awakening from slumber at the Eco-Lake, Singapore Botanic gardens.

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My exploration of new poetry continues.  Some of it is rather confuzzling (I love suggestion that I am in a state of confusion & puzzlement!  Thank you y.prior for the introduction to this delicious word!).  Some eye-opening & mindblowing (reading lots of poetry written by Singaporeans; yes!  we do have a body of work to boast of).  And some I simply love! love! love! (Jack Spicer, Amy Lowell,  Tse Hao Guang).

I have experimented with some new forms: some I find easier to use than others.  I am also consciously working on elevating the writing; I continue to struggle with what this means, and how to get it done effectively.